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colostrum

Evaluation of the effects of oral colostrum supplementation during the first fourteen days on the health and performance of preweaned calves

Extract: 

Although ensuring that calves have APT is the most significant management factor to ensure the health of neonatal calves on calf ranches, colostrum supplementation during the first 2 wk of life in calves was effective in reducing diarrheal disease and the use of antimicrobials. The ADG up to 4 wk of age in colostrum-supplemented calves was significantly greater compared with that in control calves, likely because of a combination of greater energy intake through the liquid feed, increased grain intake, and fewer days with diarrhea.

Source: 

A. C. B. Berge, T. E. Besser, D. A. Moore, and W. M. Sischo1
College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, pullman 99164

Heat-Treated (in single aliquot or batch) colostrum outperforms non-heat-treated colostrum in terms of quality and transfer of immunoglobulin G in neonatal Jersey calves

Extract: 

Heat-treating colostrum at 60°C for 60 min, using either the Perfect Udder bag or batch pasteurizer system, resulted in a significant reduction of colostrum bacterial counts while maintaining colostrum IgG concentrations compared with fresh frozen or fresh refrigerated colostrum. Calves fed heat-treated colostrum (PU or DTB) experienced significantly improved AEA and higher final serum IgG and STP measures at 24 h of age compared with calves fed fresh (FF or FR) colostrum.

Source: 

A.A. Kryzer,*1 S.M. Godden,* and R. Schell†

*Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, University of MInnesota, St. Paul 55108

†CalfStart, LLC, Altura, MN 55910

J. Dairy Sci. 98:1870-1877

http://dx.dor.org/10.3168/jds.2014-8387

 ©American Dairy Science Association®, 2015.

Reducing Failure of Passive Immunoglobulin Transfer in Dairy Calves

Extract: 

The dairy calf is unique in that its only source of early immunity is obtained passively from colostrum after birth. There are many factors that impact the early immune status of the dairy calf. Primary factors include the quality of colostrum fed, time of feeding and amount fed. The resulting condition when blood IgG levels are not met is termed failure of passive transfer or FPT. 

Source: 

A. J. Heinrichs and J. A. Elizondo- Salazar- Department of Dairy and Animal Science, The Pennsylvania State University