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Research

Results from using the DairyTech line of products speak for themselves, but as more research on the subject becomes available we post it here.

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A REVIEW OF ISSUES SURROUNDING THE FEEDING OF WASTE MILK AND PASTEURIZATION OF WASTE MILK AND COLOSTRUM

Extract: 

Professional heifer growers are faced with the challenge of raising healthy calves while still paying close attention to rearing costs and profit. Heifer raisers have several options for liquid feeding programs for young calves including whole (saleable) milk, transition milk, waste or discard milk, and milk replacer. Factors that may be considered in selecting a liquid feeding program may include the number of calves fed, economics and cash flow, nutritional characteristics, calf performance targets, resource availability (e.g.

Source: 

Sandra Godden DVM, DVSc
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota
St. Paul, MN 55108

‘So, what’s new?’

Extract: 

This was the start of a conversation that I have had with my regular Monday morning client for the past several years. I’d shrug and say “Nothin’, how about with you?”

But whenever I would return from my annual American Association of Bovine Practitioners meeting, I never got off that easily. There has always been a responsibility on my part to pass along information that I learned at the meeting to this particular client. His thought process was that if I needed to miss a weekly herd check, it had better benefit him in some way.

Source: 

Angela Daniels, Dairy Herd Management

Innovation Award is given to MilkWorks!

Extract: 

We are very proud to announce that MilkWorks was awarded the "Innovation Award" by Dairy Herd Management at this years World Dairy Expo!

Pasteurized waste milk and gut bacteria

Extract: 

While research has documented conclusively that pasteurizing waste milk significantly reduces bacterial levels in the liquid calf feed source, USDA researchers have taken an interesting look at how the feeding practice affects long-term gut flora in the animals.

Source: 

Dairy Herd Network   |   Updated: September 10, 2012

The Hidden Magic of Milk

Extract: 

Calf management has become increasingly important for many dairy producers, as scientific evidence suggests that the early stages of a heifer’s development can have long-lasting effects on her future production.

As such, more attention has been given to adequate colostrum feeding soon after birth.

Source: 

Matthew Walpole
Department of Animal and Poultry Science
University of Saskatchewan

Enhance that Colostrum!

Extract: 

Just a decade ago, pasteurizing colostrum was virtually unheard of in the U.S. dairy industry. Then, as the benefits of pasteurizing waste milk for calves were realized and the practice was embraced on-farm, interest in colostrum was sparked as well. Could the bacteria-reducing, calf-performance-enhancing results of pasteurization also be applied to colostrum?

Source: 

Maureen Hanson, Dairy Herd Management

Viability of waste milk pasteurization systems for calf feeding systems

Extract: 

The objective of this study was to determine amount and composition of waste milk (WM) generated by 13 dairy farms and to measure effectiveness of on-farm pasteurizers. Waste milk was sampled bi-weekly from three farms located in North Carolina (NC) for 28 weeks and twice from ten farms in California (CA) in June 2005 and Jan. 2006. Farms ranged in size from 530 to 7000 milk cows and included a 30,000 head calf ranch. Amount of waste milk generated ranged from 2.48 – 9.84 L/calf/d.

Source: 

Michael Chase Scott

Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Dairy Science (Management)

Robert E. James, Chair
Michael L. McGilliard
John F. Currin

On farm pasteurizer management for waste milk quality control

Extract: 

Utilization of waste milk as a source of nutrition for the growing calf. Waste milk is comprised of transition milk from cows during the first three days after calving and that collected from cows treated with antibiotics or removed from the milking string due to other illness. Surveys from Wisconsin and results from field studies conducted in North Carolina and California show it contains in excess of 29% fat and 27% protein. This compares very favorably to the nutrient content of 20% fat: 20% protein of most traditional milk replacers.

Source: 

Robert E. James and M. Chase Scott
Dept. of Dairy Science
Virginia Tech

Management and Economics of On Farm Pasteurization

Extract: 

The goal of a calf rearing program should be to optimize growth and health while minimizing risk and cost. Economics of a calf rearing program should be measured in terms of cost per lb. of gain and total cost to rear calves to a given weight/age, including mortality charges. As the price of milk replacer ingredients has increased calf growers have looked towards utilization of unsaleable milk from fresh cows and those treated with antibiotics as a source of economical nutrients.

Source: 

Robert E. James
Professor
Va. Tech Dept. of Dairy Science

M. C. Scott
Area Dairy Extension Agent
Virginia Cooperative Extension Service.

A BAMN Publication - Feeding Pasteurized Milk to Dairy Calves

Extract: 

This guide is published by the Bovine Alliance on Management and Nutrition (BAMN), which is comprised of representatives from the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP), American Dairy Science Association (ADSA), American Feed Industry Association (AFIA), and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The BAMN group is charged with developing timely information for cattle producers regarding management and nutritional practices.

Source: 

The principle author of this publication was Sandra Godden, DVM, DVSc, Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

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UNIVERSITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS CURRENTLY USING DAIRY TECH INC.

Company Name: 
Iowa State University
University of Wisconsin
University of Connecticut
Agricultural Research Station – Puerto Rico
New Sweden Dairy – Minnesota State Teaching Facility
University of Alberta
Kansas State University
Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo
Clemson University
North Carolina Dept. of Ag & CS Cherry Farm Unit
North Carolina Dept. of Ag & CS Piedmont Research Station
Land O Lakes Research Facility
University of Idaho
Ohio State University
North Carolina State University
University of Florida – Dairy Unit
University of California – Davis
Cornell University
University of Minnesota
University of Pennsylvania
University of New Hampshire
Ohio Department of Corrections
Central States Research Center
Alfred State College
California State University - Chico
Berry College
Perdue University